Bill’s Water News

Bill’s Water News2020-09-10T15:49:15-04:00

Stay in the know on all things drinking water

Dr. William B. Anderson is a Research Associate Professor and the Associate Director of the Water Science, Technology & Policy Group at the University of Waterloo. He has been active in drinking water quality and treatment research for more than 40 years, recently focusing on pathogen identification/removal/inactivation, assessment of adsorbed and desorption of contaminants on microplastics, better understanding of the role of colloidal nutrients on cyanobacterial growth in drinking water reservoirs, perfluorinated compounds, and biological filtration.

The past 15 years, Bill has maintained an email service drawing attention to items of interest to drinking water professionals including, for example, the latest research articles, regulatory updates, outbreak reports, topical issues, and media stories. Bill’s email service has expanded over time to include all interested individuals. These emails are now also archived here in a blog format as they are released, which can be explored by category or simply by scrolling through the posts below.

If you would like to join Bill’s email list for updates straight to your inbox, you can send an email to Bill to be added to the list.

2101, 2022

Using the rule revisions five-sample approach to identify schools with increased lead

January 21st, 2022|Categories: Drinking Water, Emerging Contaminants, Papers & Articles, Regulations, Water Treatment|0 Comments

an interesting paper on an “approach to classify a school’s lead risk, which could help water utilities and schools prioritizing testing and remediation efforts,” recently appeared in the journal ‘Environmental Science & Technology Letters’.

1601, 2022

Tenets of a Holistic Approach to Drinking Water-Associated Pathogen Research, Management, and Communication

January 16th, 2022|Categories: Drinking Water, Emerging Contaminants, Papers & Articles, Regulations, Water Treatment|0 Comments

A holistic approach will (i) target multiple microorganisms simultaneously, (ii) involve experts across several disciplines, and (iii) communicate results across disciplines and more broadly, proactively addressing source water-to-customer system management.

601, 2022

Guidance For Providing Safe Drinking Water in Areas of Federal Jurisdiction

January 6th, 2022|Categories: Distribution Systems, Drinking Water, Papers & Articles, Regulations, Water Treatment|0 Comments

This document is intended to provide technical guidance to assist federal departments meet their legislative obligations. It takes into consideration the unique circumstances faced by many departments in order to best protect human health

1612, 2021

Drinking Water Quality Guidelines across Canadian: Jurisdictional Variation in the Context of Decentralized Water Governance

December 16th, 2021|Categories: Distribution Systems, Drinking Water, Papers & Articles, Regulations, Water Treatment|0 Comments

review identifies key differences in the regulatory approaches to drinking water quality across Canada’s 13 jurisdictions. Only 16 of the 94 CDWQG are consistently applied across all 13 jurisdictions; five jurisdictions use voluntary guidelines, whereas eight use mandatory standards.

112, 2021

A pilot study on the feasibility of testing residential tap water: Implications for environmental justice and health

December 1st, 2021|Categories: Distribution Systems, Drinking Water, Papers & Articles, Regulations, Water Treatment|0 Comments

The article offers a very different perspective, using citizen scientists and addressing implications for environmental justice and health.

411, 2021

Removal of phytotoxins in filter sand used for drinking water treatment

November 4th, 2021|Categories: Drinking Water, Emerging Contaminants, Papers & Articles, Pathogens, Water Treatment|0 Comments

researchers from Denmark are studying phytotoxins – those produced by plants – from the potential of them being contaminants with the potential to impair drinking water quality. Of several different phytotoxins spiked into groundwater and ultimately treated by 5 different filter types, two of them, jacobine N-oxide and senecionine N-oxide, were found to be non-biodegradable. They were also able to identify some degradation products.